June 24, 2009

Spirited Away

Posted in Anime, Hayao Miyazaki, Studio Ghibli at 9:02 pm by j128

Spirited Away

"Spirited Away" DVD cover (Australian release)

Spirited Away is a 2001 film directed and written by Hayao Miyazaki. This film marked the comeback of the much-acclaimed director after his assumed retirement after the release of Princess Mononoke. Mr. Miyazaki drew the inspiration for Spirited Away during a summer vacation when he met the daughter of a friend – the daughter very much resembled the film’s heroine Chihiro in character – it is said that anybody who sets within ten feet of Mr. Miyazaki is likely to become a character in one of his films. As an example Mr. Miyazaki’s other film, Kiki’s Delivery Service, the protagonist Kiki was based upon the thirteen-year-old daughter of producer Toshio Suzuki.

In Japan the original title is Sen to Chihiro no Kamikakushi literally translated as The Spirited Away of Sen and Chihiro or Sen and the Spiriting Away of Chihiro. Spirited Away was the first anime film to win an Oscar as well as winning the Golden Bear Award at the Berlin Film Festival, being the first animated feature film of any kind to do so.

Summary

Excerpt from DVD insert: Hayao Miyazaki said, “I would say that this film is an adventure story even though there is no brandishing of weapons or battles involving supernatural powers. However, this story is not a showdown between right and wrong. It is a story in which the heroine will be thrown into a place where the good and the bad dwell together, and there she will experience the world. She will learn about friendship and devotion, and will survive by making full use of her brain. She sees herself through the crisis, avoids danger and gets herself back to the ordinary world somehow. She manages not because she has destroyed the ‘evil’, but because she has acquired the ability to survive.”

Chihiro is a ten-year-old girl (the same age as the inspiring girl) who is a sullen, bitter, and spoiled brat but by the end of the film she has undergone a metamorphosis into a confident and happier person. She and her parents are moving when her father gets themselves lost in which they find a seemingly abandoned theme park fashioned after a not-too-recent Japanese past.

Her parents find a stall with food and start eating despite Chihiro’s complaints. She wanders off and finds a bathhouse; as she begins to explore she encounters a young boy and he tells her to leave immediately and to get across the river before its too late. He creates an illusion to give Chihiro a chance to escape.

Chihiro finds her parents who have now tranformed into large pigs and understandably she freaks out and flees. However, she doesn’t go far, as the grassy field that her family had crossed is now covered with a large body of water. Adding more to her dilemma, she is slowly becoming transparent.

The boy finds her in her transparent state and convinces her to eat something that makes her solid again; he then helps her further by telling her she’ll need to get a job to survive in this spirit-inhabited world from the sorceress Yubaba.

Chihiro meets the boiler-man Kamajii, who directs a servant named Lin to take her to Yubaba. Chihiro reaches Yubaba’s lair after a degree of difficulty and assistance. In order for her to acquire a job at the bathhouse she has to surrender her name to the sorceress who renames Chihiro as Sen; this is how Yubaba retains control: she literally takes away a person’s name and renames them with only part of their name. While Yubaba is viewed as the antagonist, she is not exactly a villain, and is quite doting to her over-sized baby named Boh.

Chihiro (Sen) struggles at first but while forming strong relationships with Lin and “the mysterious and handsome” Haku (the young boy) she gains confidence and courage. Furthermore, she gains respect after helping a “Stink Spirit” but actually is a river god revealed after all of the pollution is cleansed of it. She also forms a relationship with Kaonashi a.k.a. “No Face” who helps her a lot several times in the film and she assists him as well in time.

No Face is a mysterious character as well. Though he assists Chihiro, he is also attracted to the staff’s greed, and thus offers them tons of gold while transforming into a grotesque monster and assumes the voices and characteristics of those he consumes.

Chihiro meets Zeniba, Yubaba’s twin sister who is exactly identical physically but their hearts are opposite. While Yubaba is nasty and who seems to hold no love for anyone but Boh (it seemed she had some heart for Haku until he is mortally wounded and orders him to be thrown down a hatch before he bleeds too much on the carpet) while Zeniba is a grandmotherly sort. Haku had stolen a golden seal on behalf of Yubaba and those who steal her golden seal are doomed to die. Chihiro takes it upon herself to return the golden seal to Zeniba and rescue Haku.

However, she cannot yet go to Swamp Bottom – where Zeniba resides – as she has another job to do: get Kaonashi out of the bathhouse. He is eating everything and Yubaba’s furious. Chihiro realizes that she must have let Kaonashi into the bathhouse by accident and it is up to her solely to him out.

Kaonashi tries to tempt Chihiro with gold as he did to the others but she firmly refuses; instead she gives the rest of the herbal cake that the river god had given her whom she had already given some to Haku. The herbal cake thus provokes Kaonashi to vomit everything he has consumed and he leads a rampage after Chihiro until he is his regular size.

Kaonashi accompanies Chihiro on the train to Swamp Bottom along with Boh and the hawk-like creature employed by Yubaba and both are transformed by Zeniba. The trio of heads are transformed into Boh to fool Yubaba.

Chihiro and company arrive at Swamp Bottom and are escorted to Zeniba’s cottage by an animate lamp post. Chihiro returns the golden seal even though she stepped on the slug in which she learns the slug was what Yubaba used to control Haku.

Meanwhile at the bathouse, Yubaba discovers the loss of her baby, and discusses what is necessary to release Chihiro and her parents back to the ordinary world with Haku, who is now healed and free of Yubaba’s internal control. Under Yubaba’s instruction, Haku goes off in search of Boh.

Haku finds Chihiro and the rest of the crew at Zeniba’s: Zeniba forgives Haku for the theft of the golden seal and Haku flies Chihiro and company back to the bathouse except for Kaonashi who stays with Zeniba as a helper. In the aftermath, Haku, with the assistance of Chihiro, remembers his true name, and Chihiro is given the final test – determining the fate of her family and their return to the ordinary world.

Excerpt from DVD insert: “Our story is one in which the natural strengths of the character are revealed,”Hayao Miyazaki concludes. “I wanted to show that people actually have these things in them that can be called on when they find themselves in extraordinary circumstances. That is how I wish my young friends to be and I think that this is also how they, themselves, hope to be.”

Cast and Points of Interest

Japanese Cast: (select – see first Answers.com article listed below for more detail)

  • Chihiro: Rumi Hiiragi
  • Chihiro’s dad: Takashi Naito
  • Chihiro’s mum: Yasuko Sawaguchi
  • Kamajii: Bunta Sugawara
  • Yubaba & Zeniba: Mari Natsuki

Points of Interests: Cast

  1. The signature on Chihiro’s farewell card is the first name of her voice actress.
  2. Takashi Naito, who preformed the voice of Chihiro’s dad, had been a fan of Hayao Miyazaki’s film for many years before he was offered the opportunity to star in Spirited Away. During the recording, he was rather nervous as there was Mr. Miyazaki behind him.
  3. In the scene when Chihiro’s mum is trying to get Chihiro to join them at the food stall, the actress Yasuko Sawaguchi at first put her finger in her mouth to attempt the desired effect of someone talking with their mouth full. Eventually the recording crew bought KFC and the actress said her lines while eating the chicken.
  4. Yubaba’s voice actress Mari Natsuki was excellent in her roll. As she continued to become more and more involved with her character, Yubaba became more and more alive and the crew also had their share of amusement as Mari Natsuki illustrated her dialogue with gestures.
  5. Bunta Sugawara was at the time of Spirited Away in his forties and during dialogue scenes, he even began moving his arms around like Kamajii. Furthermore, in the golden seal scene when Kamajii made that gesture to Chihiro (a member of the Disney staff compared it to the Western “cootie catcher” gesture) Rumi Hiiragi did not know beforehand what the sign meant. Mr. Miyazaki had to explain it; in which one of the crew said that “the young don’t know it these days” despite it being “all over Japan.”

Characters

  1. Chihiro’s dad is based on a real-life person: like Chihiro’s dad, the real-life person loses his way in directions while driving and he gobbles up food. Even Chihiro’s mum is based on a real person: a staff member of Studio Ghibli. Chihiro’s mum greatly resembles the real-life person and she also displays the gesture of having her elbow pointing downward while eating.
  2. As mentioned earlier, Chihiro is based on the daughter of a friend of Mr. Miyazaki’s, which he met during summer vacation at his summer cottage. Mr. Miyazaki said that she inspired him to make Spirited Away, a movie for young girls, and for those who “were ten years old and for those who will be ten years old.” Despite the fact Mr. Miyazaki made it for young girls, the film is loved by audiences young and old of all ages and whether or not they are young girls or otherwise.

Locations

The theme park (it is also referred to as an amusement park in some translations) that Chihiro and her parents discover before the adventure begin is based upon a real location in Japan nearby Studio Ghibli and which Mr. Miyazaki would visit at dusk when the crowds were thin. It is, from what I have seen, pretty much the same layout as the theme park’s buildings are in Spirited Away, though they’re more modern. However, inside the modern buildings are models of the old buildings of the past. See the Nippon Television Special for more information regarding this location and the other points of interest, which can be found in the bonus features in the DVD version of Spirited Away.

Miscellaneous

The colourful, star-shaped objects that Lin feeds the soot sprites (reminiscent of another of Mr. Miyazaki’s film, My Neighbour Totoro) are a Portuguese candy called kompeito introduced to Japan in the fifteenth to sixteenth century. In the English dub, the kompeito is called confetti. See below in the external links for more information.

Always With Me

The theme song of Spirited Away, Always With Me, was preformed by Youmi Kimura, who was a virtually unknown musician, and the lyrics were written by a friend. Miss Kimura said that a melody kept playing in her head and by request, her friend wrote the lyrics to accompany it. The two women then thought of the idea to send it to Hayao Miyazaki, as both loved his films since Princess Mononoke.

Mr. Miyazaki received the tape and enjoyed it. At the time, he was working on Rin, the Chimney Cleaner, however this film was never to be as it was turned down. Because of this action, Always With Me, wasn’t heard publicly until some years later when Mr. Miyazaki listened to it again while working on Spirited Away. He then realized that it was exactly the theme of the film he was working on. When the film premiered, Always With Me was heard publicly for the first time ever.

Merchandise

Novelizations of Spirited Away are available in graphic novel form, usually consisting of one to five volumes, and contain most of the dialogue from the film, as are most of Hayao Miyazaki’s other films. See the Nausicaa.net link below for more details.

Besides books and graphic novels there are playing cards, figurines, keychains, etc., which can be found over the Internet and elsewhere.

Spirited Away 2

Spirited Away 2 is a fan-made movie based on the characters of Spirited Away, however, it does not relate very much to the original film and it also contains a resurrection of Godzilla.

Recommended Reading

The Art of Spirited Away by Hayao Miyazaki and Stuido Ghibli Editorial Desk. It features the concept art, cell art, etc. of Spirited Away.

Personal Thoughts

In my opinion, I think that the Spirited Away DVD is the best release of any Studio Ghibli film to date, by means of special features. All the other Studio Ghibli DVDs just have original storyboards and the original Japanese trailers usually, which can get kind of boring sometimes. I really like the Nippon Television Special.

Spirited Away Trailer

Links

Spirited Away – A detailed article of the movie, etc. at Answers.com.

Spirited Away – Australian website

Spirited Away – Nausicaa.net

Spirited Away Merchandise – GhilbiWorld.com

Image(s) [under construction]

https://i0.wp.com/thecia.com.au/reviews/s/images/spirited-away-8.jpg

One of my favourite scenes: at Zeniba's house

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: